access to health for women who prostitute

Access to health for women who prostitute

Gender, stigma and health: reflections from prostitution, abortion and HIV / AIDS among womenGender, stigma and health: reflections on prostitution, abortion and HIV / AIDS among womenGender, stigma and health: reflections from prostitution, abortion and HIV / AIDS among women

Wilza Vieira VillelaSimone Monteiro Abstracts TextIntroductionWomen, prostitution and healthAbortion and stigmaStigma and HIV / AIDS among women End dates de Publicação HistóricoResumosOBJECTIVE: to discuss aspects of access to health arising from gender stereotypes and specific stigmas, among prostitutes, women who have abortions and women living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the Brazilian context.

This is a review literature narrative,

referring to recent research conducted in Brazil.RESULTS: barriers to  themselves, abort or are infected with HIV result from the connections between health problems, gender stereotypes, AIDS stigma and social inequalities, and increase the social vulnerability of these women.

CONCLUSION: actions in the scope of management, in the legislative sphere and in other sectors that interfere in health , alongside daily health service practices, they can contribute to expanding this access through interventions focused on the recognition of women’s autonomy and the guarantee of their sexual and reproductive rights. Social Stigma; Prostitution;

Abortion; Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; Review Literature as TopicOBJECTIVE: to discuss access to health as affected by aspects arising from gender stereotypes and gender-specific stigmas among women prostitutes, women who have abortions and women with HIV in Brazil. METHODS: a narrative literature review of recent Brazilian studies.

Barriers to access to health services by prostitutes

women having abortions and women living with HIV are a consequence of the connections between health problems, gender stereotypes, AIDS-related stigma and social inequalities and increase these women’s social vulnerability.CONCLUSION: actions in the health management, in legislative spheres and other sectors that affect health,

The case of the stigma related to the AIDS epidemic illustrates this perspective. Its origin derives from the connections between populations historically most affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) – such as gays, injecting drug users and prostitutes – and the historical processes of homophobia, from social rejection to the use of some drugs and the practice of sex by money for women. In other words, the stigma in relation to HIV /

  • access to health for women who prostitutetogether with daily health service practices, may contribute to expanding access through interventions focused on
  • recognition of women’s autonomy and guarantee of their sexual and reproductive rights.Social Stigma;
  • Prostitution; Abortion, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Review Literature as Topic

OBJECTIVE: to discuss aspects of access to health resulting from gender stereotypes and specific stigmas, among prostitutes, women who abort and women living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the Brazilian context. METHODS: it is a narrative review of the literature, referring to recent investigations carried out in Brazil.

RESULTS: the barrels in the access to the health of women who prostitute themselves, abort the HIV-infected resulting from the connections between health problems, gender stereotypes, AIDS stigma and social inequalities, and increasing the social vulnerability of these women.CONCLUSION: Actions in the field of management, in the legislative sphere and in other sectors that interfere in health, in addition to daily practices of health services,

can contribute to expanding this access through interventions focused on recognizing the autonomy of women and the guarantee of their sexual and reproductive rights. Social Stigma; Prostitution; Abortion; Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Revisión Literatura as AsuntoIntroduction

The impact of gender inequalities

on the morbidity and mortality profile of women and men is well known. Studies point out that, in addition to biological particularities, cultural attributions related to being a woman and being a man contribute to the occurrence of specific injuries and distinctions in access to health care and care technologies.

Stigma also operates in reducing access to health services and care, health information and resources, and the possibility of enjoying life fully and with dignity.7 Health and disease are not two sides of the same coin. If the disease is related to injury or dysfunction, health is achieved in the realization,

  • 1 Still in this direction, the injuries have been analyzed to health resulting from the association between gender
  • stereotypes and specific stigmas, 2 being highlighted that stigma compromises the exercise of citizenship and theenjoyment
  • of rights, especially the right to health.3 Based on Goffman’s definition of stigma4 as a characteristic of the subject that, socially transformed into a negative attribute,

disqualifies him and creates obstacles to his access to material and symbolic goods, it is argued that the choice of brands that will operate as stigmas is not arbitrary; it occurs in the intersection of a situation, characteristic or behavior with social axes of inequality production, such as gender, race / ethnicity, social class, sexuality and others.

5 Stigma acts with greater or lesser effectiveness in social interactions, depending on the intensity with which the axes of inequality production operate in specific scenarios. In more egalitarian contexts, the production and dissemination of stigma processes tends to be less expressive.

AIDS was produced due to the transmission routes of the virus (sexual and blood) and the pre-existing social norms to the epidemic, related to the prescription of behaviors (especially sexual ones) for women and men. based on gender stereotypes and the normalization of sexuality. It is worth remembering that the processes of stigmatization of other diseases, such as tuberculosis and cancers, were built from the perception of inadequate behavior of their patients.

6 In this sense, the analysis of the connections – between stigma and health – cannot do without a scrutiny of the dynamics of producing axes of inequalities around which they are organized, in their specific expressions for each context.3 The relationships between disease, stigma, social norms and social markers of inequality are not restricted to the attribution of negative moral qualities to patients .

in whole or in part, of the welfare projects of individuals. Although the projects may be different, they will be influenced by the insertion of subjects in specific socio-cultural realities, according to social class, race / ethnicity, exercise of sexuality and gender norms in the context in which they are inserted.7

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